The information included on this page is intended to provide helpful information and resources to current of the Northern Middlesex YMCA. Our goal is to support you as best we can, and make sure you have quick and easy access to resources. Please stay safe and well, and reach out to our Payroll and Benefits Manager, Stephanie with any questions you may have.

COVID 19 POLICY 

NMY Vaccination Policy 9.28.21

Vaccination Record Declaration 9.28.21

Request for Medical Exemption 9.28.21

Request for Religious or Spiritual Exemption 9.28.21

COVID Decision Tree UNVACCINATED Staff 9.13.21

COVID Decision Tree VACCINATED Staff 9.13.21

Employee Memo RE: Masks 5.18.21

Addendum to YMCA Covid 19 Policy 4.01.2021

Addendum to YMCA Covid 19 Policy 3.23.2021

Addendum to Employee Travel Policy 3.23.2021

Addendum to YMCA Covid 19 Policy 3.16.2021

COVID Illness - Decision Tree FULLY VACCINATED 3.16.2021

COVID Illness - Decision Tree  2.2021

COVID Wellness Support Resources 2.2021

Addendum to Covid 19 Travel Policy 12.18.20

Addendum to YMCA Covid 19 Policy 9.15.20

Addendum to YMCA Covid 19 Policy 10.08.20

Addendum to YMCA Covid 19 Policy 12.18.20

COVID-19 YMCA POLICY

Employee Personal Travel Policy Revised 8.4.2020

YMCA Employee Travel Policy 

Addendum to COVID Policy 9.13.21

EMPLOYEE WELLNESS

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PAYROLL & HUMAN RESOURCES DOCUMENTS

Addendum to Employee Membership Policy

Effective 09/15/2021

2021 Employee Handbook 

2021 Payroll Calendar

Sexual Harrassment is Illegal

Anti Harrassment Policy 

FULL TIME EMPLOYEE
RESOURCES

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Employee Memo Health Benefits Policy 4.2021

Employee Assistance Program Brochure

for FULL TIME staff enrolled in Medical Benefits. 

RETIREMENT

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Quick Links

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ANXIETY, STRESS AND COPING

 

  • The outbreak of COVID-19 and related economic crisis may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about disease, inequity and financial strain can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children.

  • Prolonged stress may exacerbate already existing or underlying psychological disorders. It also may trigger stress reactions like panic, anxiety, and depression. Additionally, families not accustomed to spending so much time in close quarters may see relationships strained.

  • Fear and anxiety about disease can lead to social stigma toward people, cultures, places, or things. Stigma and discrimination can occur when people associate a disease, such as COVID-19, with a population or nationality. Stigma affects the emotional or mental health of stigmatized groups and the communities in which they live.

  • Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. How individuals respond to the outbreak can depend on their dimensions of diversity, access to culturally relevant and inclusive care, family or employer support, geographic location, etc.

  • Coping with stress can make our communities stronger by providing support for mental health with information, resources, and local connections.

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FINDING LOCAL MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES

COVID-19 is causing major interruptions to our lives. This economic and societal disruption, coupled with the threat of contracting this potentially deadly virus, is leading many people to experience anxiety, stress and depression. Linking individuals and communities to mental health information and resources, including virtual resources, is critical during this time.

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MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES FOR YOUTH

 

COVID-19 has serious implications for the mental health of youth and the amount of stress and anxiety can be overwhelming. The emotional impact on youth depends on their characteristics and experiences, the social and economic circumstances of the family and community, and the availability of local resources. Not all youth respond in the same ways and some might have more severe, longer-lasting reactions. Helping youth cope with emergencies is critical to supporting overall community mental health.

 

  • Identifying early signs and providing appropriate support can significantly improve Children’s Mental Health. Research on the effectiveness of prevention and early intervention shows that acting early improves the lives of children and their families now and has effects that can last for decades.

  • Stigma and cultural norms regarding mental health in youth are some of the barriers to mental health treatment. There also are shortages of child and adolescent psychiatrists in some parts of the United States, particularly in rural areas. Resources to Support Adolescent Mental Health.

 

  • It can be hard to tell the difference between challenging behaviors and emotions that are consistent with typical child development, and those that are cause for concern. In general, if a child’s behavior persists for a few weeks or longer, causes distress for the child or the child’s family, and interferes with functioning at school, at home or with friends, then consider seeking help for Youth Mental Health. If a child’s behavior is unsafe, or if a child talks about wanting to hurt him or herself or someone else, then seek help immediately.

 

  • COVID-19 has serious implications for the mental health of youth that identify as LGBTQ. Even prior to the pandemic, LGBTQ youth have increased risk for depression, anxiety, substance use and suicidality, thus these youth may be particularly vulnerable to negative mental health impacts associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

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MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES FOR YOUTH

 

COVID-19 has serious implications for the mental health of youth and the amount of stress and anxiety can be overwhelming. The emotional impact on youth depends on their characteristics and experiences, the social and economic circumstances of the family and community, and the availability of local resources. Not all youth respond in the same ways and some might have more severe, longer-lasting reactions. Helping youth cope with emergencies is critical to supporting overall community mental health.

 

  • Identifying early signs and providing appropriate support can significantly improve Children’s Mental Health. Research on the effectiveness of prevention and early intervention shows that acting early improves the lives of children and their families now and has effects that can last for decades.

  • Stigma and cultural norms regarding mental health in youth are some of the barriers to mental health treatment. There also are shortages of child and adolescent psychiatrists in some parts of the United States, particularly in rural areas. Resources to Support Adolescent Mental Health.

 

  • It can be hard to tell the difference between challenging behaviors and emotions that are consistent with typical child development, and those that are cause for concern. In general, if a child’s behavior persists for a few weeks or longer, causes distress for the child or the child’s family, and interferes with functioning at school, at home or with friends, then consider seeking help for Youth Mental Health. If a child’s behavior is unsafe, or if a child talks about wanting to hurt him or herself or someone else, then seek help immediately.

 

  • COVID-19 has serious implications for the mental health of youth that identify as LGBTQ. Even prior to the pandemic, LGBTQ youth have increased risk for depression, anxiety, substance use and suicidality, thus these youth may be particularly vulnerable to negative mental health impacts associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

INCREASED RISK FOR YOUTH

 

As community mental health declines, and stress and anxiety increases due to the profound effects of COVID and the stresses brought on by mass unemployment, food insecurity and illness, there is growing concern for the safety and welfare of youth. Anytime there is increased stress, there is an increased risk of abuse on children.

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SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS

 

Millions of Americans have a substance use disorder. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) collects information on thousands of state-licensed providers who specialize in treating substance use disorders, addiction, and mental illness.

During COVID-19 the number of virtual support and recovery resources has increased in order to meet the needs and keep all communities safe. 

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VIRTUAL RECOVERY RESOURCES

 

The following is a list of Virtual Recovery Resources compiled by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration).

 

SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline

Toll-Free: 1-800-985-5990 (English and español)

SMS: Text TalkWithUs to 66746

SMS (español): “Hablanos” al 66746

TTY: 1-800-846-8517

Website (English): https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline

Website (Español): https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/disaster-distress-helpline/espanol

 

SAMHSA’s National Helpline

Toll-Free: 1-800-662-HELP (24/7/365 Treatment Referral Information Service in English and español).

Website: http://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/nationalhelpline

 

SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Center

Toll-Free: 1-800-308-3515

Email: DTAC@samhsa.hhs.gov

Website: http://www.samhsa.gov/dtac

 

Alcoholics Anonymous: Offers online support.

http://aa-intergroup.org/

 

Cocaine Anonymous: Offers online support and services.

https://www.ca-online.org/

 

LifeRing: LifeRing Secular Recovery offers online support.

https://www.lifering.org/online-meetings

 

In The Rooms - Online Recovery Meetings: Provides online support through live meetings and

discussion groups.

https://www.intherooms.com/home/

 

Marijuana Anonymous: Offers virtual support.

https://ma-online.org/

 

Narcotics Anonymous: Offers a variety of online and skype meeting options.

https://www.na.org/meetingsearch/

 

Reddit Recovery: Offers a virtual hang out and support during recovery.

https://www.reddit.com/r/REDDITORSINRECOVERY/

 

Refuge Recovery: Provides online and virtual support.

http://bit.ly/refugerecovery1

 

Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART) Recovery: Offers global community of mutual-support groups, forums including a chat room and message board.

https://www.smartrecovery.org/community/

 

SoberCity: Offers an online support and recovery community.

https://www.soberocity.com/

 

Sobergrid: Offers an online platform to help anyone get sober and stay sober.

https://www.sobergrid.com/

 

Soberistas: Provides a women-only international online recovery community.

https://soberistas.com/

 

Sober Recovery: Provides an online forum for those in recovery and their friends and family.

https://www.soberrecovery.com/forums/

 

We Connect Recovery: Provides daily online recovery groups for those with substance use and mental illness.

https://www.weconnectrecovery.com/freeonline-support-meetings

 

Unity Recovery + WEconnect + Alano Club:

Providing daily virtual meeting for those in recovery and for their family members.

https://unityrecovery.org/digital-recoverymeetings

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Additional Virtual Support Resources:

 

Mental Health America’s Inspire Community: An online community where people can connect with others. MHA hosts a dedicated mental health community, but there are communities related to a variety of topics.

https://www.inspire.com/groups/mental-health-america/

 

Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance’s Online Support Groups: DBSA online support groups provide people living with depression and bipolar disorder a place to share experiences, discuss coping skills, and offer hope to one another. DBSA support groups are peer-led, meaning they are facilitated by someone living with a mood disorder. Currently there are groups for peers, young adults, and friends and family members.

https://www.dbsalliance.org/support/chapters-and-support-groups/online-support-groups/ 

 

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HOTLINES AND WARMLINES

 

While hotlines are typically available 24/7 for those in crisis & staffed by trained crisis workers, “warmlines” are more likely to be peer-staffed, not always available 24-hours, and intended for less urgent needs and those looking for support. Practice sound judgement in determining when or how to use a hot/warm line, to use your coping skills first and to call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room if you feel you are a danger to yourself or others.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Call 1-800- 273-TALK (8255) The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

 

The National Sexual Assault Telephone Hotline
Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area.

 

Disaster Distress Helpline
Call 1-800-985-59